Tuesday, September 12, 2017

PARENTS! FIND OUT ABOUT THE SCHOOL DISTRICT'S FOOD & WELLNESS POLICY!

Thumbs up for health!
The Manchester School District is required by Federal Law to have a wellness policy. The policy supports family and community efforts to encourage student achievement and health and address childhood obesity since an active, well-nourished child is more successful in the classroom and performs better on tests.




How Can Parents Support the Policy

  • Following nutrition guidelines when providing food for classroom parties and school events 
  • Supporting non-food fundraisers or sell food items that meet the district nutrition guidelines
  • Providing healthy choices when packing snacks and bag lunches

For more information on our wellness policy, visit our district website at www.mansd.org under Departments and Food and Nutrition Services.


FOOD & WELLNESS POLICY EVALUATION RESULTS

A recent evaluation of the Manchester School District compliance of the Food and Wellness Policy is completed by school administrators annually and shared with members of the Food and Wellness Policy Council and the Superintendent of Schools.

Many schools are supporting the district wellness policy by initiating non-food related fundraisers or adjusting the fundraisers to healthier food choices. Most schools teach nutrition in the classroom and encourage physical activity opportunities and clubs. School parties frequently offer healthier choices. Vending machine choices have improved. Most schools do not use physical activity as a punishment unless there is an issue with safety of other students.

Areas of improvement are still needed in the areas of food as a reward, school birthday parties in the elementary schools, school store food and beverage choices, recess before lunch to improve student's intake of lunch and the amount of physical activity offered during the school day.


An annual district corrective action plan will be developed and shared with school administrators and the Superintendent of Schools. If you are a parent and are interested in participating on the district's Food and Wellness Policy Council, please email Sue Sheehy at SueSheehy@aol.com.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Southside Featured on Cook's Corner

Southside Middle School presented a mouth watering display of spinach stuffed chicken, garlic whole grain noodles and a colorful display of fresh vegetable salad on WMUR's Cook's Corner on Monday, August 21. Cat Levesque (pictured), chef, and Helen Guilmette, Food Service Manager, demonstrated how to prepare this delicious meal served to the students at Southside. Jim Connors, Director of School Food Services, and Jennifer Gillis (pictured here), Principal, came along to help behind the scenes. If you missed this showing, please click  on the link below. Nice job ,Team Southside!

http://wmur.com/article/lunch-lessons-southside-stuffed-chicken/12042344?src=app

Saturday, August 12, 2017

EDAMAME SALAD



A sweet and tangy combination of protein-filled beans and flavorful veggies. This salad tastes better when left refrigerated overnight or longer but can be eaten immediately.

Ingredients
2 cups shelled edamame (green soybeans)
2 cups cooked chickpeas, low or no sodium
1/3 cup minced red onion
1/3 cup minced red bell pepper
1/3 cup minced carrot
1/4 cup sunflower seeds
1/4 cup dried cranberries
10 halved grape tomatoes
DRESSING 
1/4 cup olive oil
1/3 cup honey
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons mayonnaise, olive oil or reduced fat
1/4 teaspoon celery seed, or more to taste
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more to taste
Directions
Mix edamame, chickpeas, red onion, red bell pepper, carrot, sunflower seeds, tomatoes, dried cranberries, olive oil, honey, vinegar, mayonnaise, celery salt, and cayenne pepper together in a large bowl.

Serving: 1/2 cup = Calories: 142, Sodium: 70 mg, Saturated Fat: 1 g; Added Sugar: 1g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Carbohydrate: 11g

Thursday, July 20, 2017

HYDRATION and ATHLETES

What is the most important thing an athlete can drink?
WATER! Plain water is the best way to replace all the water you lose during all sports and during all seasons. Cold water gets into the bloodstream and will cool you down faster.

Why do you get cramps when playing sports?

The most common cause of cramps is dehydration and not cold water.


What is dehydration?
When your body doesn’t have enough fluid to work properly, dehydration occurs. It is important for everyone to drink fluids or stay hydrated. Kids use more energy than adults during physical activity because they produce twice as much heat. If you do not replace the fluids, you will overheat. Many athletes are sent to the hospital for dehydration. Dehydration can affect your performance too!

How do you know if you are dehydrated?
If you are dehydrated, you may have signs such as dry mouth, headache, confusion, dizziness, weakness, faintness, and nausea.

How much fluid or water do you need?
You can’t wait until you are thirsty to drink fluids. You should be drinking fluids or water before, during, and after sports.
Before Exercise: drink 2 cups of cold water 1 to 2 hours before activity
During Exercise: drink ½ cup of cold water every 15 minutes
After Exercise: drink 2 cups of cold water for every pound of weight loss

What about sports drinks?
Sports drinks contain water, sugar, salt and sometimes unnecessary vitamins. They may be helpful for sports that last one continuous hour or more or during extreme heat. Avoid drinks with caffeine, sugar or carbonation. These drinks lead to cavities and cause unnecessary weight gain. These drinks should contain no more than 15 to 18 grams of carbohydrates per cup. Fruit juice may only be used as a fluid replacement if it is diluted at least twofold: 1 cup water for every 1 cup of juice. Carbonated beverages, high-sugar drinks and undiluted fruit juice are too high in carbohydrates and may cause stomach cramps, nausea and diarrhea
Other acceptable fluid choices are nonfat milk, almond milk, soy milk, coconut water, 100% juice, and smoothies, but water is still the best choice of fluid.

Written by Susan Sheehy, RDN, LD

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

SUMMER SNACKNG!


Snacking can be an important part of healthy eating if you choose the right foods. Use this handout to make healthy choices for you and your family. Snacking can be useful and can improve endurance prior to exercise rather than eating an entire meal. Healthy snacks can meet our nutrient needs, increase our energy levels, control blood sugars, help with weight loss and manage our hunger.
      ·        
·       Choose foods a variety from the five food groups: protein, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and dairy. Snacks should be at least two food groups.

·       Snacks should always include a fruit or vegetable in addition to another foods group. People who are losing weight or have diabetes should limit intake of fruit to 2-3 servings which is about 2-3 cups of cut up fresh fruit or 2-3 small pieces of fruit.

·       Lean protein as a snack in small amounts can last longer and help with feeling fuller so is believed to help with weight control.

·       Always carry snacks when away from home to avoid the temptation of choosing a high fat, sodium or sugar snack or beverage. Keep snack baggies, plastic storage containers, ice packs and lunch coolers on hand!

·       Water or low fat milk are the best beverage choices. Infused water or hot or cold naturally flavored ice teas are a great choice. Other choices are unsweetened soy or almond milk.


 SNACK SUGGESTIONS!
  • Celery with all natural peanut butter
  • Reduced fat cheese or part skim string cheese with whole grain crackers & 4 oz. 100% fruit juice
  • Whole grain popcorn & 4 oz. 100% juice or water with fruit slices
  • Mini pizza made with whole grain pita or English muffin topped with vegetables, part skim mozzarella cheese and low sodium tomato sauce
  • Yogurt parfait: berries, low sugar, nonfat yogurt and 2 Tablespoons of low sugar granola
  • Trail mix: high fiber, low sugar cereal, unsalted nuts, unsalted pumpkin or sunflower seeds and 1-2 Tablespoons craisins
  • Nonfat cottage cheese and pineapple
  • Part skim mozzarella and tomatoes
  • Baby carrots, grape tomatoes, peppers with hummus
  • Half whole grain bread with all natural nut butter and bananas
  • All natural nut butter and apples
  • Berries with nonfat, low sugar yogurt
  • Smoothie with nonfat yogurt, 100% juice and frozen unsweetened or fresh fruit
  • Low sugar, whole grain cereal (1/2 cup),  nonfat milk and ½ banana
  • Half whole grain sandwich with tuna or lean meat (leftover chicken or turkey)
  • Half small pita loaded with vegs, reduced fat shredded cheese and hummus
  • Dark leafy green salad, almonds and mango or unsweetened mandarin oranges
  • Avocado and/or low sodium salsa with whole grain sweet potato corn chips