Friday, December 19, 2014

Strategies for Holiday Eating

As the holidays approach, so do the numerous parties. This can present many challenges when trying to eat healthy. Here are some helpful strategies to keep your outings healthy and happy.
  • Move your socializing away from the food.
  • Start your day with smaller meals if you plan on treating yourself later.
  • Include as many fruits and vegetables as you can either prior to the party or during the party.
  • Don't starve yourself prior to the party. It takes 20 minutes for the stomach to tell the brain you are full. You can eat a lot in 20 minutes.
  • Don’t rush to eat– take time to socialize.
  • Start off with a nonalcoholic, low-calorie drink.
  • If there is a buffet, scan the entire buffet before putting every food item on your plate.
  • Include some type of exercising when possible. Walking or climbing the stairs are activities that don't require going to the gym.
  • Maintain weight rather than setting a goal for weight loss during the holidays to avoid disappointment.
  • Most of all, enjoy the holidays!



Thursday, December 4, 2014

Stay on Track for the Holidays

When the winter holidays arrive, many individuals tend to forget about their commitments to healthy eating. With the stress of planning events and catering to your family’s needs, along with the cravings for traditional holiday foods, it is easy to slip into some unhealthy eating habits. If you are hosting a holiday event, there are several ways to alter traditional recipes to cut fat, salt, and calories. These suggestions ensure that taste is not sacrificed in the making!
  • Substitute two egg whites for each whole egg in a recipe to cut cholesterol
  • Use low-sodium chicken broth when preparing mashed squash or potatoes. The strong flavor of the broth reduces the need for tons of added butter or margarine.
  • Substitute applesauce for oil, butter, or margarine in baked goods like muffins and quick breads. Try substituting a small amount first as the texture and flavor of the product may change
  • Sliced almonds can make a delicious topping on green bean casserole instead of fried onions
  • Remember to use low-fat cheese when making casseroles and other holiday dishes





Saturday, November 1, 2014

Whole Grain Apple Cranberry Stuffing



2 cups low-sodium chicken broth, hot
1 cup dried cranberries
1 cup chopped celery
1 onion, chopped
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and finely chopped
6 cups day-old whole grain baguette, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
3 large eggs, scrambled
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 dried sage leaf, chopped




Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray an 11-inch oval baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. Combine the broth and cranberries in a small bowl and let soak for 30 minutes. Saute the celery and onions in the butter in a large skillet until tender, 5 minutes. Add the apples and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from the heat and transfer to a large bowl.
Place the baguette cubes into a largebowl. Pour the broth and cranberries over. Pour in the eggs, and then add the salt, poultry seasoning, pepper, cinnamon and sage and mix together.
Mix in the onion and celery mixture. Spoon the stuffing into the prepared dish and bake until the center is set, 35 to 40 minutes.


Thursday, October 2, 2014

Healthy Apple Crisp


INGREDIENTS:

1/3 cup all-purpose flour (can do 1/2 whole wheat flour)

1/4 cup packed light brown sugar

1/3 cup regular oats

1/4 teaspoon ground pumpkin pie spice

1/4 cup chilled butter

3 tablespoons chopped walnuts

7 cups sliced peeled apples

2 TBSP maple syrup

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon


DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 375°.

2. Lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife. Combine flour, sugar, oats, and 1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice in a medium bowl; cut in butter with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture is crumbly. Stir in walnuts.

3. Combine apple and remaining ingredients in a large bowl; toss well. Spoon apple mixture into an 8-inch square baking dish or 1 1/2-quart casserole. Sprinkle with crumb mixture. Bake at 375° for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm.

Nutrition Facts - Amount per serving—Calories: 208, Fat: 7.1g, Saturated fat: 3.4g, Protein: 1.8g Carbohydrate: 36.5g, Fiber: 2.3g, Cholesterol: 14mg, Sodium: 58mg





Monday, September 15, 2014

Creative and Healthy Fundraising Ideas

 Fundraising doesn't have to be just about food! Take a look at some of suggestions below. Use your creativity because sometimes the simplest ideas make the biggest impact!  

  • walk-a-thons
  • bike-a-thons 
  • jump-rope-athons
  • rent-a-teen helper (rake leaves, water gardens, mow lawns, wash dog)
  • car wash (pre-sell tickets as gifts) 
  • singing telegrams
  • talent shows
  • read-a-thons 
  • haunted house or hayride
  • decorate your own pumpkin contest
  • spelling bee
  • science fairs
  • carnivals (halloween, Easter)
  • dances (kids, father/daughter, family, Sadie Hawkins) 
  • workshops/classes
  • recycling cans/bottles/paper
  • golf tournament
  • bowling night/bowl-a-thon 
  • skate night/skate-a-thon
  • auction (teacher does something for kids)
  • raffles (teachers do a silly activity)
  • magic show 
  • family/glamour portraits 
  • treasure hunt/scavenger hunt 
  • horseshoe competition
  • penny wars (pennies+1 point, nickels+5, quarters+25, team w/most points wins) 
  • raffle (movie passes, theme bags) 
  • conference
  • treasure hunt/scavenger hunt
  • craft sales 
  • corn hole family competition
  • tennis/horseshoe pitching competition 
  • festivals focusing on different cultures
  • Take Your Parents/Grandparents to Lunch Day
  • "Story time with the Principal" class raffle
  • "Principal for the Day" raffle
     
For more ideas, visit:
www.cspinet.org/resource/fundraising-options-available-schools
or 
www.pinterest.com/georgiadoe/healthy-fundraising-ideas.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

An Apple a Day!

AN APPLE A DAY.... APPLES REALLY ARE GOOD FOR YOU!

Eating fresh apples is always good for you, but to get the full nutritional benefits associated with eating apples you should eat at least one fresh apple every day. The average U.S. consumer eats about 19 pounds of fresh apples a year — about one apple per week. 

WHOLE-BODY HEALTH BENEFITS

Lower blood cholesterol, improved bowel function, reduced risk of stroke, prostate cancer, type II diabetes and asthma. The disease-fighting profile of apples provides a multitude of health benefits, including a potential decreased risk of cancer and heart disease. Several recent studies suggest apples may provide a "whole-body" health benefit. A number of components in apples, most notably fiber and phytonutrients have been found in studies to lower blood cholesterol and improve bowel function, and may be associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, prostate cancer, type II diabetes and asthma. Findings indicate that two apples a day or 12 ounces of 100% apple juice reduced the damaging effects of the “bad” LDL cholesterol. 

CANCER PREVENTION

Over the past four years, apple consumption has been linked with reduced cancer risk in several studies. A 2001 Mayo Clinic study indicated that quercetin, a flavonoid abundant in apples, helps prevent the growth of prostate cancer cells. A Cornell University study indicated phytochemicals in the skin of an apple inhibited the reproduction of colon cancer cells by 43 percent. The National Cancer Institute has reported that foods containing flavonoids like those found in apples may reduce the risk of lung cancer by as much as 50 percent.